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The Facts

  • There are over 3 million cases of child abuse reported in the United States each year.
  • Most experts agree that actual incidents of abuse are more numerous than statistics indicate.
  • Children in America ages birth to 4 years old are at the greatest risk of suffering severe injury or death due to abuse or neglect.
  • The national cost associated with child abuse treatment is estimated at $94 billion each year.
  • A child who has been physically or sexually abused is more likely to develop certain medical conditions or illnesses later in life.
  • An abused or neglected child is more inclined to exhibit destructive behaviors later in life, including drug abuse, eating disorder, depression, suicide, and sexual promiscuity.
  • Shaken baby syndrome is a form of child abuse. About 60% of children who survive will do so with severe disabilities.
  • Nearly two thirds of individuals receiving treatment for substance abuse reported being abused as a child.
  • A child who has been sexually abused is twice as likely to succumb to alcohol abuse later in life.
  • A child who has been sexually abused is almost four times more likely to develop other chemical addictions as an adult.
  • Children who have been abused or neglected are 59% more likely to be arrested as a juvenile, 28% more likely to be arrested as an adult, and 30% more likely to commit a violent crime.
  • A child who has been abused is 25% more likely to experience teen pregnancy.
  • One quarter of all children from abusive households require special education services from our public school system (between kindergarten and twelfth grade).
  • California's foster youth population is the largest in all 50 states. There are approximately 82,000 foster children in California which is 20% of all foster children nationwide.
  • Circumstances that place parents under substantial stress (e.g. divorce, unemployment) can increase the risk of child abuse.
  • One third of abused and neglected children will eventually victimize their own children.
  • Abuse can happen in any family, regardless of age, race, income, religious affiliations, or educational background.
  • Intervention programs offering help can positively impact a family at risk and are important in preventing child abuse.
  • The Children's Crisis Center is a child abuse prevention/intervention program operating four shelters in Stanislaus County: Sawyer House (Modesto), Marsha's House (Ceres), Guardian House (Oakdale), and Verda's House (Turlock).
  • The Crisis Center is licensed by the State of California Community Care Licensing and has been serving the community since 1980.
  • All services are provided free of charge to high risk families residing within Stanislaus County.
  • The Crisis Center served over 4,200 families, comprising more than 7,200 children last year alone.
  • Approximately 135 children receive respite shelter services daily through the four shelters at the Crisis Center.
  • Approximately 40 new families (about 80 children) are referred to the Crisis Center each month through various local agencies (CPS, law enforcement, schools, hospitals, and homeless shelters) seeking respite childcare services.
  • 80% of the children who utilized services at the Crisis Center are under five years old.
  • Two thirds of all children who receive respite childcare services at the Crisis Center are actively involved or have been involved with Child Protective Services.
  • 78% of the children who receive respite childcare services at the Crisis Center have one or both parents who abused drugs.
  • Approximately 80% of the clients who utilize services at the Crisis Center are single parents.
  • The average length of service for each family seeking respite childcare services at the Crisis Center is 12 weeks (3 months), with 40% of the families continuing to use services beyond the 3-month period.
  • Service hours and total number of children served at the Crisis Center generally increases during the winter months when homeless shelters are overcrowded with families seeking refuge from the harsh weather conditions.
  • The Crisis Center provides nurturing, homelike environments, offering proper nutrition, security, encouragement and growth opportunities that develop trust, promote higher self-esteem, and foster positive behaviors and attitudes for children who receive services.
  • The Crisis Center's programs provide immediate separation of children from parents at times when critical family events have heightened the potential for abuse and neglect allowing children who are at-risk time away from the negative circumstances of their family life.
  • Parents overwhelmed by their life stressors are given time away from their parenting responsibilities to focus on their immediate and long-term coping strategies.